Summer Fellowships for Visiting Faculty

Richmond Summer Visiting Faculty Fellowship Programme

Each summer AIFS and Richmond the American International University will award up to 5 non-stipendiary Richmond Summer Visiting Faculty Fellowships for existing university Partners and AIFS Affiliates.  For summer 2018 the Fellowship will be hosted at Richmond’s Rome campus (on Piazza Sant’ Andrea della Valle, a few steps away from Piazza Navona, Campo de’ Fiori and the Pantheon).

The fellowships will provide Visiting Fellows with room and board in centrally located accommodations nearby the university’s Rome campus from Monday, June 4th (check-in) until Saturday, June 16th (check out).[1] Rooming will consist of double /single rooms in shared apartments. Accommodations are equipped with beddings,  kitchen utensils and internet. A meal allowance to the value of 30€ per day will be provided for use in restaurants or to purchase food to cook in your own apartment.

Fellows are expected to take up their fellowship during Richmond’s summer 1 period (June 4-15) and are responsible for obtaining and financing their transport to Rome and within the city. The fellowships are designed to:

  • strengthen the relationship between the university and its partners
  • enhance faculty research and perhaps drive collaborative work in this area
  • strengthen best practice in teaching

Where possible Visiting Fellows may be asked to give a guest lecture in at least one summer class gratis and will be required to attend a one-day informal symposium (June 15) with other successful Visiting Fellows and Richmond faculty to discuss their research. Visiting Fellows are also asked to acknowledge The American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS) and Richmond the American International University in London (RAIUL) in any publications which derive from the fellowship and to provide the university with a copy of said publication.

Applications for the fellowships are competitive and to be submitted by email to Professor Dom Alessio, the Dean of International Programmes (alessid@richmond.ac.uk), by midnight on December 1 of the year prior to the award. The application should consist of a CV and a short 500-1000 word explanation of the proposed nature of the research project or desired pedagogical learning outcome, and explain why Rome is the best place for them to conduct their research. Candidates will be selected by a committee led by Richmond’s Associate Dean for Research in conjunction with the Dean of International Programmes (London), the Dean of Richmond (Rome) and AIFS.


Richmond Rome 2018 Fellows (June 4-15, 2018)

Dominic Alessio: “From the Dutch East India Company to Daewoo: Empires and Corporations”

Dom is professor of history and Dean of International Programmes at Richmond, the American international University in London. A former Canadian Commonwealth Scholar to New Zealand, he has published/edited over forty articles, book chapters and books on empire and the far right. He is currently working on an ambitious political history investigating definitions of empire and diverse methods of empire formation, in particular the impact this has had on indigenous/minority peoples. This includes the buying and renting of imperial territory and the role of non-state actors in the imperial process, namely filibusters, religious organisations and now for this presentation- corporations.

Andrew Boyd: “Five Years of Pope Francis: Encountering the Other in Faith. Ecumenical and Interreligious Themes from the ‘Reformer Pope’”

Andrew (A.J.) Boyd lectures for Richmond in Rome and has been teaching theology, philosophy, and religious studies in Rome for five years, and has lived here since 2009. Originally invited to Rome as a Russell Berrie Fellow in Interreligious Dialogue for a two-year graduate fellowship, he found the Eternal City too irresistible to leave in too short a time. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2000, and has pursued graduate degrees at The Catholic University of America, Seattle University, the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas, and engaged in research and study opportunities at Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, the Tantur Ecumenical institute in Jerusalem, and the Cardiff University Centre for Law and Religion. His primary research areas are ecumenical ecclesiology, the history and theology of the papacy, and contemporary interreligious dialogue and encounter. Courses taught include Aesthetics, Comparative World Religions, Ecclesiology, Ecumenism, History and Theology of the Papacy, Interreligious Dialogue, New Testament, Patristics, and Philosophy of Religion.

D. Brown: “James Bond as Cold Warrior: Researching and Teaching 007”

Dr Martin D. Brown, F.R. Hist.S., is an Associate Professor of International History, with a specific interest in C20th diplomatic history, the Cold War, and nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe. His recent research has been focused on the historiography of the forced removal of the Sudeten German minority from Czechoslovakia, resulting in publications in English, Czech, German and Polish. He co-edited a collection of essays written by distinguished central European historians entitled ‘Slovakia in History’ (2011) for Cambridge University Press. His current research project examines the prosopography of the corps diplomatique at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), 1972-5. In this presentation he considers James Bond (007) as a global brand and as a popular cultural icon. While Bond appears to be a quintessentially British creation, his Cold War adventures unfolded across a global stage and the associated books, comics, films and videogames have established a genuinely transnational legacy. Irrespective of the occasional reports of his demise, the Bond franchise surges on into the C21st. ‘Bond’ also has now become the default reference in any international crisis involving espionage, most recently with the mounting tensions between NATO and the Russian Federation that some consider to be the beginnings of a new Cold War (2.0). But what was Bond’s role in the Cold War? Were his exploits simply a crude form of British anti-Communist propaganda, or did commercial concerns constrain the political format of the brand? The evidence presented in the novels, films and secondary literature offers a far more complex relationship between the ‘spy’ and the Global conflict than might be expected. As a corollary to this issue how can we use ‘Bond’ in the classroom? How useful is the Bond franchise in communicating aspects of Cold War culture to students?  This talk is part of a project with Dr Muriel Blaive (Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes, Prague) and Dr Ronald Granieri (Foreign Policy Research Institute/University of Pennsylvania) designed to lead to a book proposal to the Routledge Studies in Espionage and Culture series.

Peter Covino: “Dario Bellezza (1944-1996): Finalising his Selected Poems”

Peter is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Rhode Island where he teaches courses in Poetry, Italian American Literature, and Ethnic Studies. He is also one of the founding editors-directors of the literary press, Barrow Street Inc. While in Rome, he will be finalizing research toward the publication of a book-length translation of Selected Poems by the prizewinning and controversial Italian poet, novelist, and playwright Dario Bellezza (1944-1996). Bellezza won wide-acclaim, including the Viareggio Prize for Morte Segreta (Secret Death) 1976, as well as the Montale Prize, for L’avversario (The Adversary) 1994, and the Gatti Prize for Invettive e Licenze (Invective and License) 1971; 1992, reissued.  Since Bellezza was born in the working-class Monteverde section of Rome, and lived his entire adult life in Campo dei Fiori and Trastevere, this residency will be especially conducive to the continued development of the project’s intensive exploration of his literary milieu. Bellezza’s poetry seems to be striking a particular cultural nerve as it speaks frankly about sexuality, mortality, and issues of queer identity without pandering or being reductively political. Covino’s translations of Bellezza’s work have appeared in such publications as: the New European Poets (Graywolf) anthology, whose Italian section he helped edit, Asymptote, Atlanta Review, Colorado Review, Interim (U of Las Vegas), 2Bridges Review (NYC College of Technology), and Witness part of the Black Mountain Institute for International Writing.

Erica D’Amico: “Byzantine tableware and food habits from the 10th to the 14thC within the Italian peninsula”

Dr D’Amico is an Adjunct Professor of History at Richmond the American International University in Rome. She holds a PhD in Archaeology from Durham University, UK. An archaeology and pottery specialist she has collaborated since 2004 with Ca’ Foscari and S. Gelichi, Professor of Medieval Archaeology in Venice, carrying out several projects in Italy and abroad, mainly in Turkey and Montenegro. As an archaeologist of the Middle Ages she has a particular interest in Food History. She also holds a research grant from the American Academy in Rome and the Getty Foundation which allows her to work on the specific theme of “National Narratives and the Medieval Mediterranean”. In her paper she will attempt to examine firstly the environment in which Byzantine tableware (10th-14th centuries) was used, mainly considering Italian archaeological contexts (such as urban, religious, rural, magnate residencies) but also to understand the ancient societies who used this pottery from an anthropological angle. The intention is to travel back in time and enter the rooms, the interiors of the buildings and sites that have been revealed by the trowels of modern archaeologists and to think about where and how tableware was used and displayed. In the second part she will try to contextualize this data within a food history scenario, namely by considering the dining habits of the consumers and how variations occurred through the centuries, and thus place the pottery within a wider social context.

Lynn Donahue: “Creating a new global service-learning offering with a disciplinary focus on refugees”

Lynn is Director of the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement and an Adjunct Instructor in Peace and Social Justice Studies at St. John Fisher College, NY. Lynn will engage in four areas of research needed to create a new global service-learning offering with a disciplinary focus on refugees. This course will be an adaptation of the current global service-learning offering through Richmond, The American International University, in partnership with community agency Jaol Nafuma Refugee Center. Research topics include Fair Trade Learning Practices, Asset-Based Community Development, Italian Refugee/Migrant Crisis, and Global Pedagogy. Fair Trade Learning Practices (Hartman, 2015; Larsen, 2016) is a set of principles for community-driven and reciprocally beneficial partnerships that would form the foundation of the global SL offering in Rome. Asset-Based Community Development (Garoutte & McCarthy, 2014) is the identification of assets and needs through interviews and ethnographic participation. In 2017, over 85,000 migrants arrived in Rome and 15,000 since the beginning of June, a 19% increase from this point last year (Time Magazine, July 11, 2017). Research will focus on historical and current data on refugees and migrants in Rome and treatment of and services for migrant and refugee people to develop a contextual foundation for the course and SL projects. Additional related research topics would include privilege and oppression, global citizenship (AAC&U publication Models of Global Learning), and cultural competencies.  This research will provide the foundation for an AIFS service-learning course with recommended service-learning project options, course readings, assignments, and assessment.

Laura Fenelli, “Creating and Coping a Miraculous Image: The case of St Dominic of Soriano”

Laura Fenelli (Ph.D., Medieval History, University of Bologna, 2007) teaches History and Art history at Richmond the American International University in Florence. Her research on the miraculous icon of Saint Dominic of Soriano is part of a broader study on the miraculous images of saints, started with a postdoctoral fellow at the KHI, Florence (2007–11) and pursued in 2011 thanks to a short-term Frances A. Yates fellowship at the Warburg Institute (London) and research fellowships at NIKI (Florence) and Istituto Sangalli (Florence). The icon of St. Dominic of Soriano, a late Quattrocento canvas which shows the founder of the Dominican order, arrived at the Calabrese convent near Vibo Valentia on the night of 5 September 1530, miraculously transported there by the Virgin Mary, Saint Catherine of Alexandria and Mary Magdalene, as related by an almost contemporary hagiographical account. Alongside a short analysis of the historical and hagiographical sources concerning the history of the image, the research presented in this paper focuses on specific problems connected to the numerous copies of the image, diffused in almost all Dominican churches by the second half of the sixteenth century. These reproductions, which create a sort of mise-en-scene depicting the prodigy of the painting’s arrival and the presence of the three women saints, allow us to trace the spread of the miraculous Calabrian image and its use in Europe – especially Spain, but also in the Flanders – as a defense of sacred images in the Counter-Reformation, and, later, in the Christianization of the Americas. This global figurative network of the reproductions of miracle images in paintings and prints which spans from Italy to Europe and to Americas and Far-East, in a sort of multiplication – generally typical of relics – which tended to preserve and to replicate the miraculous power of the original, will help to reflect on the relationship between texts, images, and relics in Modern times and on the often tense relationship between the artist responsible for the copies, the miraculous object, as well as the act of creation and reproduction.

Robert Irons: “Francesco Patrizi’s Critique of Aristotle’s Poetics”

Robert is an Assistant Professor of Classics at Hampden-Sydney College in Hampden Sydney, Virginia, where he teaches courses on Greek and Latin language, etymology, western culture, and classical literature in translation.  His pedagogical and research interests include classical philology, poetry, drama, and classical reception.  His project examines Patrizi’s critique of Aristotle’s Poetics.  The monumental influence that Aristotle’s Poetics has had on the history of literary criticism and theory cannot be overstated.  However, when the Greek text became available with the 1508 Aldine publishing of the treatise, very few European scholars outside of Italy took any notice at all.  The beginnings of the massive influence that the Poetics would eventually wield can be clearly traced to 16th century Italy.  In general, the majority of the scholars and commentators working on the Poetics at this time in Italy struggled to explicate its inherent obscurity or, alternatively, tried to assimilate Aristotelian concepts with largely accepted and better-known views expressed in Horace’s Ars Poetica.  Yet there was at least one dissenting voice among Cinquecento commentators who treated Aristotle with reverence and admiration: Francesco Patrizi, who, in his 1586 treatise Della Poetica, details several Aristotelian definitions of mimesis and then systematically and convincingly refutes each.  This project seeks to clarify, scrutinize, and defend each of Patrizi’s arguments opposing Aristotle’s conceptions of tragedy and mimetic art.

Timothy J. Madigan: “Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) and the Circulation of the Elites”

Timothy is Professor and Chair of Philosophy at St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY. While in Rome he will be examining Vilfredo Pareto, a polymath who wrote in such areas as economics, mathematics, philosophy, political theory, psychology, and sociology. An Italian aristocrat, he was initially an advocate of liberal reform and a strong proponent of free trade. In his masterpiece A Treatise of General Sociology (1916), he questioned his initial support for increasing democratic participation. By exploring the economical, psychological, and sociological roots of human behavior he came to the conclusion that all societies are ultimately ruled by a small group (an elite) and that it is inevitable that there will be an unequal distribution of power, prestige and honors. Pareto was critical of social reformers who thought that the masses could somehow be empowered and could overthrow existing power elites. Instead, he argued that any such revolution would necessarily lead to a new set of power elites in control—what he called “the Circulation of the Elites.” He will examine Pareto’s own works, especially that on his concept of “the Circulation of Elite” and explore its relevance as a possible explanatory tool for understanding present-day populist movements.

Erika Milburn: “Virgin, Whore, Goddess or Monster? The Siren Parthenope and Personifications of Early Modern Naples”

Erika Milburn has taught Classical Mythology at the Rome Center of Richmond University since 2013. Her research interests lie mainly in Italian Renaissance literature, with a particular focus on Petrarchist verse, lexicography and the reception of classical texts. She has written on Renaissance Naples, publishing a book on the Petrarchist poet Luigi Tansillo and collaborating on a complete critical edition of his lyric verse, alongside a variety of articles on Renaissance topics. For the past fifteen years she has also worked as a professional translator specializing in archaeology, art history and architecture. According to legend, the city of Naples was founded where the body of the mythical monster Parthenope was washed ashore after she committed suicide in dismay at her failure to lure the hero Odysseus to his death. In later periods, the siren continued to be used as a symbol of the city in both literature and the figurative arts, but her identity was contested and negotiated in different ways depending on the context. This paper considers the various ways in which early modern authors represented the siren Parthenope, the different pressures – literary, religious, political – that may have conditioned her depiction, and the sources – ancient and modern – on which they based their accounts. In particular, it will focus on early modern descriptions and guidebooks, which represent one of the principal sources for understanding how early modern Neapolitans viewed their city and its origins.

Lorenzo Picchi: “New or Old Mafia? An Analysis of the Strategies and Patterns of the Sicilian Mafia from 1994 to 2006”

Lorenzo teaches History at Richmond University in Florence; he is also an adjunct Professor at the University of New Haven. He is an honorary member of the anti-Mafia association Fondazione Caponnetto and is currently studying for a Ph.D. candidate at Freie University of Berlin. His main field of research is the history of the Sicilian Mafia. Through transcripts and trial verdicts, DIA reports, parliamentary inquiry documents and newspaper articles, the research presented in this paper analyses the relationship patterns between Mafia, economy, and politics from 1994 to 2006, addressing the continuities and discontinuities of these relationships compared to previous periods. Following the attacks on the State that reached their climax between 1992 and 1993 Italian governments that have held power since 1994 have favoured a process of “legalization” of the Mafia, in such a way as to make what happened outside the Mafia, among its accomplices and protectors, appear more important than what went on inside the criminal organization. With the beginning of the so-called Second Republic, coinciding with increasingly stricter forms of political control over the judicial, inaugurated by Silvio Berlusconi’s advent to power, the judiciary policies implemented by Italian governments, as well as quite a significant number of public statements released by government officials and politicians of various levels and parties (although differing according to which coalition, party or politician) have ended up obstructing and discrediting the activity against organized crime by law enforcement agencies. This occurred at the very point in history just as such agencies were attaining results against organized crime, and especially the Sicilian Mafia, that had never been achieved before. This process led to a change in the Mafia, represented by the defeat of its military dimension (the criminal association Cosa Nostra) and by the simultaneous victory of its other dimension, the so called borghesia mafiosa, the Mafia middle class of white-collar workers, entrepreneurs, politicians, bureaucrats, and so on.

Damion Waymer: “Defining Government Public Relations: An Analysis of the Public Relations Strategies of Caesar Augustus and the Roman Empire”

Damion (PhD, Purdue University, 2006) is full professor and Department Chair of Liberal Studies at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University. His main area of research is the analysis of organizational discourse, public relations tactics, government communication, issues management, corporate social responsibility (CSR), branding, and strategic communication. He is an internationally recognized scholar of government public relations, particularly in the context of the United States. For example, he has published refereed journal articles analysing official US governmental apologies to citizens that the government has wronged (e.g. The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and President Clinton’s apology to the family and survivors); articles that have explored the paradoxical nature of government communication in light of gentrification and urban renewal efforts; and he has published articles that have explored the hegemonic effects that gerrymandering has on black voters in the US. While Damion has explored government public relations in US contexts primarily, he seeks to find common threads that are applicable to the study of government public relations in contemporary Western societies. Thus, in this research he examines the antecedents of government public relations by analszing what many scholars and laypersons alike consider the best public relations campaign in history. Caesar Augustus, on behalf of the Roman Empire, orchestrated a multi-national government public relation campaign that spanned several years. Thus, the research presented in this paper examines the strategies and tactics orchestrated by Augustus that made this the best public relations campaign ever. Examples of texts analysed in this research presentation include, but are not limited to: an examination of the poet Virgil’s epic poem, The Aeneid, that Augustus commissioned (and the response and success of that poem); Augustus’ announcement of Caesars as deities and its effects on the Roman Empire; the ways that Augustus “courted” public opinion; and the strategies he used to save and rebuild Rome after the collapse of the republic. Damion uses lessons from this campaign to develop normative prescriptions of what components optimal government public relations in contemporary Western societies should include.

Rome Fellows Symposium (June 15, 2018)

Rome Fellows Symposium (June 15, 2018)

RICHMOND UNIVERSITY ROME CENTER

PIAZZA S. ANDREA DELLA VALLE 6

00186 ROMA

TEL. +39 06 6875 296

Room: Classroom Y

9:00-9:30am. Registration and coffee/tea/biscuits

9:30-9:50: Welcome

Professor John Annette, President of Richmond the American International University in London

Ailsa Brookes, Senior Vice President, American Institute For Foreign Study (AIFS)

Rosanna Graziani, Dean of the Rome Campus, of Richmond the American International University in London

 

Session 1: Classical Influences (chair: Dom Alessio)

9:50-10:10 Damion Waymer (North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University): “Defining Government Public Relations: An Analysis of the Public Relations Strategies of Caesar Augustus and the Roman Empire”

10:10-10:20 Erica D’Amico (Richmond Rome): “Byzantine tableware and food habits from the 10th to the 14thC within the Italian peninsula”

10:20-10:40 Robert Irons (Hampden-Sydney College): “Francesco Patrizi’s Critique of Aristotle’s Poetics”

10:40-10:50 Questions

10:50-11:10 Coffee and Tea

 

Session 2: History (chair: Mary Robert)

11:10-11:30 Dominic Alessio (Richmond, London) and Wesley Renfro (St John Fisher College): “From the Dutch East India Company to Daewoo: Empires and Corporations”

11:30-11:50 Lorenzo Picchi (Richmond Florence): “New or Old Mafia? An Analysis of the Strategies and Patterns of the Sicilian Mafia from 1994 to 2006”

11:50-12:10 Martin Brown (Richmond, London): “James Bond as Cold Warrior: Researching and Teaching 007”

12:10-12:20 Questions

 

12:20-13:30 Lunch: Buddy, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II 107A

 

Session 3: Art and Literature (chair: Martin Brown)

13:30-13:50 Laura Fenelli (Richmond Florence), “Creating and Coping a Miraculous Image: The Case of St Dominic of Soriano”

13:50-14:10 Erika Milburn (Richmond Rome): “Virgin, Whore, Goddess or Monster? The Siren Parthenope and Personifications of Early Modern Naples”

14:10-14:30 Peter Covino (University of Rhode Island): “Dario Bellezza (1944-1996): Finalising his Selected Poems”

14:30-14:40 Questions

 

14:40-15:00 Tea/Coffee break

 

Session 4: Contemporary Issues (chair: Mary Robert)

15:00-15:20 Andrew Boyd (Richmond Rome): “Five Years of Pope Francis: Encountering the Other in Faith. Ecumenical and Interreligious Themes from the ‘Reformer Pope’”

15:20-15:40 Timothy J. Madigan (St. John Fisher College): “Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) and the Circulation of the Elites”

15:40-16:00 Lynn Donahue (St John Fisher College): “Creating a new global service-learning offering with a disciplinary focus on refugees”

16:00-16:10: Questions

16:10-16:30: Concluding Remarks: Professor Mary Robert, Dean of Liberal Arts and  Professor Martin D. Brown, Associate Dean of Research, of Richmond the American International University in London

19:30 Dinner: Al Pompiere, Via di Santa Maria de’ Calderari 38, Roma

Second Summer Fellows symposium – June 16, 2017

Richmond Rome 2017 Symposium (June 16, 2017)

RICHMOND UNIVERSITY ROME CENTER

PIAZZA S. ANDREA DELLA VALLE 6

00186 ROMA

TEL. +39 06 6875 296

Room: Classroom Y

9:00-9:30am. Registration and coffee/tea/biscuits

9:30-9:50: Welcome

Professor John Annette, President of Richmond the American International University in London

Ailsa Brookes, Senior Vice President, American Institute For Foreign Study (AIFS)

Rosanna Graziani, Dean of the Rome Campus, of Richmond the American International University in London

Professor Martin D. Brown, Associate Dean of Research, of Richmond the American International University in London

Session 1: Religion

9:50-10:10: Laura R. Olson (Professor of Political Science and affiliated faculty member in the Program in Religious Studies, Clemson University, USA): “Explaining Belonging: The Strength and Salience of Religious Identification in Comparative Context”

10:10-10:30: Dominic Alessio (Professor of History & Dean of International Programmes, Richmond the American International University in London, UK) and Lucas Villegas-Aristizábal (Associate Professor of Medieval History at Queen’s University – Bader International Study Centre at Herstmonceux Castle, Canada/UK): “From the Hospitallers to ISIS: Non-State Religious Organisations and Empire”

10:30-10:40 Questions

10:40-11:00 Coffee and Tea

Session 2: Politics & Society

11:00-11:20: Sébastien Lazardeux (Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Legal Studies, St. John Fisher College, USA): “The Sociology of the 5 Star Movement and the Switch from Movement to Party Strategy.” 

11:20-11:40: Martin D. Brown (Professor of History and Associate Dean of Research, Richmond the American International University in London, UK): “Executors or Creative Deal-Makers? The Role of the Diplomats in the Making of the Helsinki CSCE”

11:40-12:00: Nadine Braunstein, (Assistant Professor, Family and Consumer Sciences Department, California State University, Sacramento, USA): “Food and Nutrition Policy – Challenges and Solutions”

12:00-12:10 Questions

12:10-13:30 Lunch: Richmond University Rome Centre

Session 3: Cities

13:30-13:50: Erica D’Amico (Adjunct Professor of History, Richmond the American International University in London, UK/Italy): “”Different Approaches and Perspectives on the Origins of Venice

13:50-14:10: Erika Milburn (Adjunct Professor of Classics, Richmond the American International University in London, UK/Italy): “The ‘Phantom’ River Sebeto and Myth-Making in Early Modern Naples

14:10-14:30: Antonella Merletto (Adjunct Professor of the History of Art, Archaeology and History of Architecture, Richmond the American International University in London, UK/Italy): “Taking Care of Public Health in Greek and Roman Times: the Invention of the Public Toilet”

14:30-14:40 Questions

14:40-15:00 Tea/Coffee break

Session 4: The Arts

15:00-15:20: Annu Palakunnathu Matthew (Professor of Art (Photography) & the Director of the Center for the Humanities and the 2015-17 Silvia Chandley Professor of Non-Violence and Peace Studies, the University of Rhode Island, USA): “The Indians of Monte Cassino

15:20-15:40: Marjorie Och (Professor of Art History at the University of Mary Washington, USA): “A ‘Cult of Friendship’ in the Letters and Portraits of Vittoria Colonna (ca. 1490-1547)”

15:40-16:00: Deborah C. Mitchell (Professor of English & Film Studies and Chair, Division of Communications, Arts, Languages, and Literature, Westminster College, USA): “Il Bel Paese nella letteratura e nel cinema: una prospettiva italiana (The Beautiful Country in Literature and Cinema: Through Italian Eyes)”

16:00-16:10: Questions

16:10-16:30: Concluding Remarks: Professor Dominic Alessio, Dean of International Programmes

19:00 Dinner: Grappolo D’Oro, Piazza della Cancelleria 80, 00186 Roma – Ph. 06 6897 0

rome fellowship

First Annual Summer Fellows Symposium (Tuesday, June 21, 2016)

Richmond University, The American International University in London

First Annual Summer Fellows Symposium (Tuesday, June 21, 2016)

Lecture Hall, 17 Young Street: 10am – 4pm

10am: Welcome and Refreshments

Welcome from the President of Richmond University, The American International University in London: Professor John Annette

Welcome from the Senior Vice President of the American Institute for Foreign Study: Ailsa Brookes

Welcome from the Associate Dean of Research: Professor Martin Brown

10:30 – 12pm: Session 1 Popular Culture

10:30-10:50: Ann K. McClellan (Plymouth State University –English): “Sherlock Holmes in/and Popular Culture”

10:55-11:15: Jennifer Purcell (St Michael’s College – History): “Writing the Biography of BBC Radio Star Mabel Constanduros (1880-1957)”

11:20-11:50: Alex Seago (Richmond University, The American International University in London – Communications): “What Is This Pop? – English Pop Graphic Design 1956-1966”

11:50-12:00 Questions

12:00-12:15: Coffee/Tea Break

12:15-1:15: Session 2 Society

12:20-12:40: Ed Madden (University of South Carolina – Women’s & Gender Studies): “Colm Clifford: Homosexuality in Irish Culture”

12:45-13:05: Paul Rekret (Richmond University, The American International University in London – International Relations): “All Grown Up? Childhood From the First to the Second Summer of Love”

13:05-13:15: Questions

13:15-14:30: Lunch

Refreshments, sandwiches, wraps, crisps, fruit selection, fruit juice and sparkling water

14:30-16:00: Session 3 History and Politics

14:30-14:50: Lawrence McDonnell & Kathleen Hilliard (Iowa State University – History): “Slavery and Agriculture at Betty’s Hope Plantation, Antigua, 1650-1944”

14:55-15:15: Charles Bunce (Mount St Mary’s University – Film Studies):

“Science Fiction & Human Rights: The Storyteller’s Sword of Social Justice”

15:20-15:40: Wesley B. Renfro (St John Fisher College –Political Science) and Dominic Alessio (Richmond – History): “The Empire’s Not So New Clothes: Rethinking American Exceptionalism”

15:40-15:55: Questions

 16:00 Symposium Finishes

 18:00 Symposium Dinner

Cote Brasserie, 47 Kensington Court, London, W8 5DA

first fellowship