Mind in Society Research Centre – Richmond University

Mind in Society Research Centre

Mind in Society Research Centre

MISSION STATEMENT 

The Mind in Society Research Centre at Richmond University provides a framework for bringing together researchers and practitioners from the psychological, social, educational and biological sciences who are interested in investigating the complex interactions between the individual and the social world. The Centre offers unique opportunities for extending knowledge and understanding of how psychological, social and cultural factors influence the individual’s behaviour, thoughts and feelings, as these issues are investigated from inter-disciplinary perspectives that employ a wide range of methodologies. The Centre is run by the Department of Psychology, therefore students enrolled on this programme, as well as alumni, are automatically members.

MAIN OBJECTIVES

  1. Encourage inter-disciplinary exchanges within Richmond University and other Higher Education institutions through the following:
    • Annual seminar series: these seminars include theoretical, practical and experiential elements and are designed to attract a diverse range of participants from within and outside the university,
    • Annual conference: the theme of the conference is set by the members of the DoP. Students’ participation is also strongly encouraged.
    • Annual Mind in Society lecture: the centre holds an annual lecture, bringing an academic or practitioner of international standing to Richmond University, to deliver a talk on a topic of his or her choice.
  2. Promote student and staff interest in research through the following:
    • Organisation of scholarly activities: conferences, workshops and other relevant initiatives offer our students opportunities to expand their research interests and staff the opportunity to present their work and disseminate their research findings.
    • Formation of research groups: these groups consist of volunteer research assistants and are run by faculty interested in specific topics. Organising research conceptually into groups permits the pooling of resources, the multiplication of academic networks and attracts the interest of external funding bodies. It is also an outstanding opportunity for students to gain insight into a field and to acquire a set of skills that cannot be gained in the classroom, as having volunteer assistants working for the Center, rather than the individual, gives them exposure to different topics and methodologies across semesters. This fact enhances the student experience and it also improves student employability.
People

Professor Ira Konstantinou, Head of DoP
Ira’s research interests are in the area of memory awareness and she has recently started working on bringing two lines of research together, that of memory awareness and that of factors contributing to own-race bias. She is also conducting pedagogical research with a focus on critical thinking in undergraduate students.

Professor George Beguno
George’s scholarly activities are in the areas of the history and philosophy of psychology. Specifically, he is interested in phenomenological explorations of lived experience; and the application of philosophical ideas in clinical practice. He is currently working on a phenomenological-historical study of the use of technological artefacts in war.

Dr Annita Ventouris
Annita’s research interests span from applications of psychology in educational settings, intergroup and peer relations, race and ethnicity issues in education to child and adolescent psychosocial development and wellbeing. She is also interested in factors that can affect HE students’ wellbeing. She is currently working on a project related to the role of the lecturer in affecting students’ perceived resilience levels.

Dr Mark Horne
Mark’s research focuses on changes in both memory performance, and physical performance across the lifespan. He is interested in the application of the Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition to older adult visual working memory, and declines in performance in amateur triathletes with increasing age.

 

 

Faculty Publications

George Berguno           

Berguno, G. & Bowler, D. M. (2004). Communicative interactions, knowledge of a second language and theory of mind in young children. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 165 (3), 293-309.

Berguno, G. & Loutfy, N. (2009). A Phenomenological Study of Sudanese Children’s Experience of Seeking Refuge in North Africa. Schutzian Research, 1, 27 – 49.

Berguno, G. (1998). Teaching phenomenology as a social activity. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, Volume 9.2, 18-23.

Berguno, G. (1998). The role of constraints on descriptions in phenomenology. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health, Vol. 1, No. 2, 271-279.

Berguno, G. (2001). The phenomenology of waiting. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, Volume 12.2, 154-159.

Berguno, G. (2002). The Unforgiven: A phenomenological study of revenge. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, Vol. 13.2, 214-220.

Berguno, G. (2004). Encountering the dark spaces of selfhood. In: Personhood, Publications in Philosophy, Volume 68, 29-35. (Edited by H. Ikäheimo, J. Kotkavirta, A. Laitinen & P. Lyrra)

Berguno, G. (2006). The Body as Limit and as Speech. Metaphysical Researches, March Issue, St. Petersburg University Press. (Published in Russian as Тело как предел и речь)

Berguno, G. (2006). The existential elucidation of evil. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 17.1, 117-122.

Berguno, G. (2007). The Duel for Existenz: An Existential Reading of Arturo Pérez-Reverte’s “The Fencing Master”. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 18.1, 60-69.

Berguno, G. (2008). Daniil Kharms and the Art of the Microstory (Personal Essay). Brittle Star Literary Journal, 20, 19 – 23.

Berguno, G. (2008). Towards a New Conception of the Human Condition. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 19.2, 246-253.

Berguno, G. (2011). Evanescence and Tragic Beauty: An Existential Reading of Yukio Mishima’s “The Temple of the Golden Pavilion”. Existential Analysis, 22.2, 280 – 290.

Berguno, G. (2014). A Phenomenological Analysis of Existential Conscience in James Ivory’s (1993) “The Remains of the Day”. Existential Analysis, 25.1, 91 – 102.

Berguno, G. (2015). A Phenomenological Meditation on Shinya Tsukamoto’s Vital. Existential Analysis, 26.1, 86 – 93.

Berguno, G., & Bowler, D. M. (2004). Understanding pretence and understanding action. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22, 531-544.

Berguno, G., Leroux, P., McAinsh, K. & Shaikh, S. (2004). Children’s experience of loneliness at school and its relation to bullying and the quality of teacher interventions. The Qualitative Report, 9(3), 483-499.

Dorrell, C. & Berguno, G. (2004). A Comparative Analysis of Zen Buddhism and Heidegger. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, Vol. 15.1, 162-171.

Loutfy, N. & Berguno, G. (2005). The existential thoughts of the Sufis. Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 16.1, 144-155.

Willig, C., Berguno, G., Cooper, M., Milton, M., du Plock, S. & Spinelli, E. (2015). SEA Conference – Round Table and Open Forum: ‘The Challenge to Theory in Existential Psychotherapy’. Existential Analysis, 26.2, 225 – 236.

Ira Konstantinou

DuToit, K., Smith, L. and Konstantinou, I. (2014). The effect of immediate forced false responses on delayed recognition memory accuracy and confidence ratings. The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Global Studies, 8(3), 1-16.

Konstantinou, I. (2013). Levels of processing and memory awareness when recognising own-race versus other-race Faces: Implications for eyewitness memory. The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Global Studies, 7 (1), 39-50.

Konstantinou, I.  (2016). Development of critical thinking skills in Psychology students. The Magazine for the Association for the Teaching of Psychology, 2, 18-19.

Konstantinou, I.  (2017). Cross-race bias and its implications for eyewitness testimony. The Magazine for the Association for the Teaching of Psychology. Manuscript in preparation.

Konstantinou, I. and Cohen, M. (2014). Are our students evolving into critical thinkers? Darwin forbid! The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, 21, 27-36.

Konstantinou, I, Richardson, T.L., Johnson, C.K., and Lunasha – Kennedy, F.S. (2016). Effects of infra-humanisation processes on cross-race recognition memory. Manuscript in preparation.

Professional Engagements

George Berguno           

Berguno, G. (1997). Young children’s understanding of representations does not provide them with a theory of mind. Paper presented at SRCD Biennial Conference, held in Washington DC, April 1997.

Berguno, G. (1999). A reference to a deceptive interaction facilitates young children’s understanding of false belief. Paper presented at SRCD Biennial Conference, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 1999.

Berguno, G. (2002). Children’s experience of loneliness at school and its relation to bullying and the quality of teacher interventions. Paper presented to the Third Phenomenological Psychology Forum held in London, April 2002, by invitation.

Berguno, G. (2003). Understanding self through others: An existential-phenomenological approach to human development. Paper presented at the XIth European Conference on Developmental Psychology held in Milan, Italy, August 27-31, 2003.

Berguno, G. (2004). Encountering the dark spaces of selfhood. Paper presented at Dimensions of Personhood, International Conference, Jyväskylä, Finland, August 13-15, 2004.

Berguno, G. (2004). The existential elucidation of evil. Paper presented at the Third Central- and Eastern European Conference on Phenomenology: Subjectivity, Intentionality, Evil (In memory of Józef Tischner, 1931-2000), held at the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, November 26-28, 2004.

Berguno, G. (2007). A Schutzian Critique of Contemporary Psychological Research. Paper presented at the Alfred Schütz und die Hermeneutik, International Conference, held in Vienna, September 2007, by invitation.

Berguno, G. (2007). Towards a New Conception of the Human Conception. Paper presented at the Laboratory for Metaphysical Researches, Saint Petersburg University, June 2007, by invitation.

Berguno, G. (2012 & 2013). Exploring Existential Conscience in Therapeutic Practice. A one-day clinical workshop presented at the Royal Society of Medicine on November 24, 2012, and June 29, 2013 as part of the Authentica Existential Practitioners series.

Berguno, G. (2012). The Simulator as Escapist: A Phenomenological Contribution to Simone de Beauvoir’s Ethics of Ambiguity. Paper presented at the 20th International Conference of the Simone de Beauvoir Society, Oslo, Norway, June 20 – 23, 2012.

Berguno, G. (2014 & 2015). Working with Regret, Resentment and Revenge. A one-day clinical workshop presented at Birkbeck College, University of London on October 18, 2014, and June 27, 2015 as part of the Authentica Existential Practitioners series.

Berguno, G. (2014). A Phenomenological Study of the Crisis of Conscience Prior to Occupational Burnout. Paper presented at the 4th International Bridges Phenomenology Conference, Kaohsiung University, Taiwan, June 2014.

Berguno, G. (2015). A Phenomenological Study of Burnout and Organizational Cynicism. Keynote speech presented at the Symposium: Hubris in Business and Management, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, May 20th 2015.

Berguno, G. (2016 – 2017). Working with Disillusionment and Pessimism. A one-day clinical workshop presented at Birkbeck College, University of London on July 9th 2016, as part of the Authentica Existential Practitioners series. This workshop was also presented to the Society for Existential Analysis on February 25th, 2017.

Ira Konstantinou

Classroom Challenges: Behaviours, Diversity and Space Conference (2015, March). Center for Learning and Teaching, Richmond, the American International University in London, attendee and member of organizing committee.

Classroom Management Workshop (2014, October). Center for Learning and Teaching, Richmond, the American International University in London, attendee and member of organizing committee and attendee.

Konstantinou, I, Negas, C., Karayianni, I., Ventouris, A., and Horne, M. (2017). Embedding critical thinking skills in the Psychology curriculum, colloquium accepted to the Twenty-fifth International Conference on Learning 2018 Special Focus: Education in a Time of Austerity and Social Turbulence, 21–23 June, University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Konstantinou, I, Richardson, T.L., Johnson, C.K., and Lunasha – Kennedy, F.S. (August 2016). Infra-humanization effects when recognizing own-race versus other-race faces: Implications for eyewitness testimony. Paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Imperial College London, UK

Konstantinou, I. (2012, April). Levels of processing and memory awareness when recognising own-race versus other-race faces: implications for eye-witness memory. Paper presented at The British Psychological Society Annual Conference, London, UK.

Konstantinou, I. (2012, July). Levels of processing and memory awareness when recognizing own-race versus other-race faces: Implications for eye-witness memory. Paper presented at the XXX International Congress in Psychology. Proceedings in Cognitive, International Journal of Psychology, 47:sup1, 109-151.

Konstantinou, I. and Cohen, M. (2014, July). Are our students evolving into critical thinkers? Darwin forbid! Paper to be presented at the 21st International Conference on Learning, New York, USA.

Konstantinou, I. and Dyberg, M. (2014, May). Evidence-based student engagement: lessons from cognitive science. Paper to be presented at the Student Engagement Conference organised by the Centre for Learning and Teaching at Richmond, the American International University in London.

Teaching and Research: The ‘strawberries and cream’ of psychology (November, 2015). BPS DART-P Workshop, London, attendee.

The Undergraduate Education Committee Programme Liaison Day (May, 2016). BPS UEC, Birmingham, attendee.

Wylde, C. and Konstantinou, I. (October, 2015). Assessment practices workshop. Presented at the Assessment, feedback and Moderation Conference, Center for Learning and Teaching. Richmond, the American International University in London.

Postgraduate Prospectus