Choosing Core Courses Level 1

(Level Two courses may be substituted provided pre-requisites have been satisfied.)

Numerical

Any MTH course above MTH 3000 Fundamentals of Mathematics

Sciences

BIO 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Biology
The basis for study is the human body. This course deals with the healthy body and what can go wrong, and how the individual can maintain his or her body as far as is currently understood. Topics include: cell structure; viruses and their effect; cancer; digestion; nutrition; circulation; immunity; the endocrine system and genetics.
BIO 3105 (3.000 CREDITS) Human Biology
Under the broad heading of ‘the variety of life’, this course deals with the structure of the living cell, patterns of life in the environment, evolution and a survey of the main phyla of plants and animals.
BIO 3130 (3.000 CREDITS) Ecology: Principles and Applications
This course will examine themes in the relationship between organisms and the environment. Students will study the natural history, ecology, geology and plant and animal adaptations in selected habitats. This course will also provide students with a broad understanding of the science of both ecosystem and evolutionary ecology, and this study of ecosystems integrates information from physics, chemistry and biology to provide the necessary basic science to understand the controls on photosynthesis, decomposition, and nutrient cycling across diverse terrestrial and aquatic landscapes. The demographic characteristics of populations and simple models of population growth and natural regulation as well as community structure, including competition, predation, species diversity, niches and succession. *REPLACED BY COURSE ENV 3140 FROM FALL 2013 ONWARDS*
BIO 3140 (3.000 CREDITS) Turnng Points In History Life Sciences
A unique mix of history and science, this course follows the history of the Life Sciences using historical and scientific Turning Points. The course explores changing conceptions of living beings within the context of the intellectual, cultural, religious and social preoccupations of the time and geographical areas in which they arose. Specific areas include the natural philosophy of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, early Islamic and Chinese medicine, the European Renaissance and the founding of a scientific approach to the study of life in the 18th and 19th centuries. The culmination of biological thought in the 19th century is exemplified by Mendelian Genetics and the Darwin-Wallace theory of evolution, and the discovery of DNA in the 20th century provides a capstone to 10,000 years of scientific biological thought, exemplifying Unity in Diversity.
ENV 3110 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations of Geology
A basic introduction to some of the major themes of the science of geology, this course covers the basic principles of the evolution, physical structure and composition of our planet. Topics include the internal structure of the earth, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes and volcanism, the three basic rock types (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic), basic mineralogy, and weathering processes. The environmental implications of geological processes will be a unifying theme.
ENV 3120 (3.000 CREDITS) Energy: A Global Perspective
A basic introduction to the major themes of modern and historical energy use, this course covers the basic science of energy use and technology and the history and science of humankind's spiralling and sometimes insidious drive for new forms of energy. From pre-history through to the industrial revolution and beyond this course takes a historical, environmental and comparative approach to the development of animate power, windmills, watermills and traditional uses of biomass, through to the industrial revolution and the modern use of fossil fuels, including electricity generation. Investigations of more modern energy use such as nuclear fission and fusion, along with renewable technologies such as wind turbines, hydroelectrics, solar, geothermal, biomass and fuel cells allow the course to explore the possibility of managing energy sources for the benefit of all.
ENV 3125 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Environmental Studies
A basic introduction to the major themes of Environmental Studies, this course covers basic ecology, environmental ethics, and environmental science. Well known environmental issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, acid rain, pollution, and population issues are addressed from scientific, economic, politico-sociological and ethical standpoints. An awareness and appreciation of global, local, and personal environmental problems are developed, together with the implications of possible solutions. The concept of interrelatedness is a unifying theme throughout the course.
Natural hazards are becoming increasingly frequent and are exacting an increasing toll on our planet. This course aims to show how these hazards and environmental change are intimately linked. A combination of global warming and increased vulnerability seems that few parts of our planet will escape these effects in the coming years. The direct or indirect effects of flood, windstorm, wildfire, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other geophysical events will be examined in detail. However, until a hurricane obliterates Miami or wildfires obliterate London the dramatic influences on our environment will be continued to played down or even disregarded.
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the science of ecology through a study of ecosystems, conservation, biodiversity, and selected endangered or threatened species. The course will address natural and anthropogenic causes of species' decline and extinction and possible conservation techniques that are, could be, or could have been, used to reverse the extinction or decline. As well as some typical 'poster species', other less well know but equally important species will be discussed.

Behavioral

This course provides an introduction to the study of mass media in contemporary modern societies. The course will pay particular attention to the production and consumption of mass media, including newspapers and magazines, television, film, radio, and the internet. Thus the course will encourage students to critically analyse the strategies of media giants, the impact of media ownership over democracy, the effects of media over culture, identities and public opinion. Each topic of the course will be examined with reference to contemporary examples of mass media.
PLT 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations of Politics
Introduces students to the study of politics by defining, exploring and evaluating the basic concepts of politics through the analysis of modern and contemporary ideologies. It outlines some of the central issues in the study of politics such as the nature of the political itself; power and authority in the state; political obligation; the rights and duties of the citizen; liberty and equality; economic systems and modes of production through the scope of central political ideologies such as liberalism, Marxism, conservatism, feminism, multiculturalism and environmentalism.
PLT 3105 (3.000 CREDITS) Comparative Political Systems
Examines the political experience, institutions, behavior and processes of the major political systems. Analyses major concepts, approaches and methods of political science in order to produce comparative analyses of different states and governments and provide a critical understanding of political decision-making processes in modern states.
PSY 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Psychology
Introduces students to the major areas within the psychology discipline, through current empirical research and theoretical debate. Topics include: scientific methodology; brain functioning; sensation and perception; evolutionary theory; consciousness; development; personality; social psychology; psychopathology; language; and learning. Students discover how psychological research is conducted and how research findings can be applied to understanding human behaviour.
PSY 3105 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Social Psychology
This course is designed to expose students to the discipline known as Social Psychology, the scientific study of how people come to understand individuals, groups, and themselves as social entities. Social psychological processes influence how we perceive, judge, remember, and behave toward people. These processes shape, and are shaped by, our social expectations, social roles, social goals, and social interactions. Although it may seem that social psychologists merely study “the obvious” (e.g., attractive people are more liked than unattractive people), the field has made a significant impact both theoretically (e.g., theories about the formation of stereotypes and prejudice) and practically (e.g., how organizations can make better decisions). Through a series of lectures, videos and class discussions, this course will examines the influence people have on each other’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviours.
SCL 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations of Sociology
An introduction to the study of society. Topics include: the origins and nature of sociology and the social sciences; society and culture; social institutions such as family, education, and work; socialization; social stratification, power, and social change; industrialization; and urbanization.

Expressive

ADM 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Making Your Mark
This course introduces students to a range of procedures and processes in order to investigate practical perceptual and conceptual concerns within Fine Art through a series of practical two and three dimensional tasks and assignments. Drawing plays an essential role in the development of ideas coupled with the manipulation of materials and media for creative goals, enabling students’ to acquire knowledge and skills essential for their personal progression and development as artists. This course is designed to complement ADM 3105 Cycling The Square and as such they are an accumulative introductory experience to Art, Design and Media. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3105 (3.000 CREDITS) Cycling The Square
This course introduces students to a range of procedures and processes in order to investigate practical perceptual and conceptual concerns within Design practice through a series of two and three dimensional practical tasks and assignments. Drawing plays an essential role in the development of ideas coupled with the manipulation of materials and media for creative goals, enabling students to acquire knowledge and skills essential for their personal progression and development as designers. This course is designed to complement ADM 3100 Making Your Mark and as such they are an accumulative introductory experience to Art, Design and Media. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3150 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Ceramics
Introduces practical studio skills in ceramics. Students work on a number of projects in tile-making and ceramic sculpture and also learn some of the standard methods of ceramic decoration. Students learn how ceramics are glazed and how work is processed in the electric kiln. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3155 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Painting
This course introduces the fundamental principles of painting. Students explore hands-on approaches to paint application, colour and composition through a number of set projects that result in the making of a final painted work. There is emphasis placed on the relationship between drawing and painting and a sketchbook is used to encourage and develop this. The course also includes one museum visit as part of the aim to contextualize the work produced in class within a broader context. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3160 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Photography
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3165 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Printmaking
This course introduces students to monoprinting, relief printing and drypoint. The relationship between ideas generation and the printmaking process is central, enabling images to be explored experimentally and sequentially while establishing sound basic techniques in printmaking processes. Drawing, photography and digital media play an important role as means for research and information gathering both visual and as text. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3170 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations in Spatial Design
This course introduces students to the uses and organisation of space as a means for exploring sculptural and applied design solutions. Consideration is undertaken into how space can be measured, calculated and investigated through schematic drawing and drawing projection systems leading to individual applied design solutions. Students also engage in the manipulation of sheet material and construction methods in order to explore and discover personal expression in sculptural form. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ENG 3195 (3.000 CREDITS) Writing From Creative Impulse
During interactive class sessions, student creative writing is investigated, developed and refined. As part of this process, similarities and differences that exist between academic and creative writing are identified. Through class work that explores the creative impulse and fosters engagement with a variety of texts as a springboard, students are steered through multiple drafts of their work towards the attainment of a professional level of written presentation. Each student creates a portfolio of work during the semester, and this is assessed at the end of the course. *REPLACED BY COURSE CRW 3200 FROM FALL 2015 ONWARDS*
THR 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations of the Performing Arts
This course introduces student to the basic principles of breathing, relaxation, vocal techniques and the oral interpretations of play texts and poetry. Students will explore the fundamentals of speaking in front of an audience. Drama games, storytelling, role-playing, playwriting and improvisation are used to explore the basic tenets of performance, with a specific focus on training the actor’s voice for performance.

Temporal & Spatial

ARH 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Foundations of Art Across Cultures
This course focuses on key ‘moments’ of Western and non- Western art, and interaction between and across cultures. It includes an examination of art in antiquity, as well as cultural rediscoveries and cultural interaction (such as the Renaissance); colonialism and the exploration of “new worlds”, the impact of European travellers on indigenous artistic practices, constructs of Tradition, the Primitive and the Orient; and the ways in which contact with non-European cultures affected the development of modern European art. The course includes museum visits to introduce students to a wide range of art from antiquity to the present.
BIO 3140 (3.000 CREDITS) Turnng Points In History Life Sciences
A unique mix of history and science, this course follows the history of the Life Sciences using historical and scientific Turning Points. The course explores changing conceptions of living beings within the context of the intellectual, cultural, religious and social preoccupations of the time and geographical areas in which they arose. Specific areas include the natural philosophy of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, early Islamic and Chinese medicine, the European Renaissance and the founding of a scientific approach to the study of life in the 18th and 19th centuries. The culmination of biological thought in the 19th century is exemplified by Mendelian Genetics and the Darwin-Wallace theory of evolution, and the discovery of DNA in the 20th century provides a capstone to 10,000 years of scientific biological thought, exemplifying Unity in Diversity.
DEV 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) Development and Culture: Reps Film Lit
This course introduces students to key ideas relevant to the study of culture and development, with particular emphasis on how the global South is represented through film and literature. It provides students with a broad understanding of the debates and issues related to globalization and the politics of representation within various historical and cultural contexts. Relevant themes such as race, gender, identity, migration, wealth and poverty and the environment are explored across different regions including Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.
ENV 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) World Regional Geography
This course offers a basic introduction to regional and social geography through selected regions of the globe. The course will include historical and modern aspects of geography, basic geographical terminology, population patterns and demography, the influence of poverty and affluence, and basic medical geography. All topics will be approached from a cultural and environmental perspective.
ENV 3120 (3.000 CREDITS) Energy: A Global Perspective
A basic introduction to the major themes of modern and historical energy use, this course covers the basic science of energy use and technology and the history and science of humankind's spiralling and sometimes insidious drive for new forms of energy. From pre-history through to the industrial revolution and beyond this course takes a historical, environmental and comparative approach to the development of animate power, windmills, watermills and traditional uses of biomass, through to the industrial revolution and the modern use of fossil fuels, including electricity generation. Investigations of more modern energy use such as nuclear fission and fusion, along with renewable technologies such as wind turbines, hydroelectrics, solar, geothermal, biomass and fuel cells allow the course to explore the possibility of managing energy sources for the benefit of all.
HST 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) World Cultural History I
The course serves as a broad introduction to world cultures from the beginnings of humankind in Africa through to the end of Western Roman Empire in AD476. The peoples and cultures covered include: Neolithic society, Sumeria, Egypt, the Hittites, Assyria, Persia, the Greek world (including Alexander the Great and the successor kingdoms of the East), Han China, Rome, Islam, and the Byzantine Empire. The course aims to give the student a general understanding and appreciation of some of the art, architecture, philosophy, literature, religion, and politics of the cultures being studied. It also draws attention to diversity as well as similarities within and between regions and countries, emphasising the considerable interaction that occurred between different places and peoples. Specific attention will be paid to how historians study the past, including different forms of evidence and historiographical debates.
HST 3105 (3.000 CREDITS) World Cultural History II
This course is designed to study in broad outline the origins of global interdependence, from 1500-1800. The politics, religion, art and architecture of European, Islamic and East Asian cultures will be studied. In world terms, the period is most noteworthy for the impact of European expansionism, sustained by scientific invention and commercial acquisitiveness, underpinned by religion. While the class work focuses on the discussion of broad themes supported by close reading of relevant primary texts, students will practice presenting specific topics in group oral presentations. Class visits are scheduled to relevant exhibitions in London.
LIT 3100 (3.000 CREDITS) The City Experience & Imagntn
This course explores a variety of city experiences as reflected in fiction and film. These representations are placed in two contexts, the historical and the imaginative. Particular stress is laid on the city as a site of intercultural experience as well as on the cultural contrasts and comparisons between particular cities. Drawing on the students’ own international variety of experience, the course offers the opportunity for some creative work on these topics in addition to their academic writing.

First Year Seminars

FYS 3100 (1.000 CREDITS) First Year Seminar for EAP Programme
Richmond’s First Year Programme aims to facilitate successful student transition to the academic, social and cultural challenges of an international university in a global city. In conjunction with the other EAP Programme courses, FYS 3100 is designed to engage students as active learners, encourage reflection on goals and personal development and develop core academic skills. Through a series of class sessions and workshops often conducted by outside speakers, this one-credit course focuses in particular on Personal Development Planning and the production of a personal e-portfolio, the PDP, which will be built upon throughout a student’s university career.
FYS 3105 (4.000 CREDITS) Utopia And Dystopia
Utopias are fairytales, dreams and visions about perfect worlds and future societies. Dystopias are the opposite - nightmare scenarios of oppressive and totalitarian outcomes from social, political, economic, cultural and technological developments in the contemporary world. Crucially, one person's utopia can be another person's dystopia! First year students are encouraged to immerse themselves in these alternative (but-not-too-far-off-our-own) worlds in a range of mediums - but particularly through film and literature. Utopias and Dystopias provides a broad framework for the development of critical thinking skills, as well as providing an indirect route to critical commentary on our own societies.
FYS 3110 (4.000 CREDITS) Changing Stages: Landmarks in Theatre
Changing Stages: Landmarks in Theatre is a course which seeks to introduce students to some major milestones of Western Drama from the Greeks through to the present day. Dramatic readings of play texts, films and theatre visits will be used to explore the impact these plays have had on the culture of their own time and how they impact on our consciousness today. No piece of theatre is ‘dead’; it is a vibrant, exciting and engaging experience which speaks to its audience with a thundering clarity.
FYS 3120 (4.000 CREDITS) The Philosophy Of Ethics
This course is an introduction to ethics, one of most enduring but nonetheless contentious subjects of virtually all philosophical and religious traditions. It examines what may be meant by terms such as right and wrong, and discusses some ways that different cultures have envisioned a 'good', balanced or virtuous life. Students are encouraged through conversation and debate to think critically about the language of ethics and the intercultural aspects of the subject, and to engage with real-life ethical issues as diverse as sexual morality, political violence and honesty (including academic honesty). Students acquire a knowledge of some basic Western philosophical terminology to help articulate these issues. Thinkers such as Kant, and Hume from the European secular tradition are considered along with Christian, Islamic, Buddhist and Taoist texts among others.
FYS 3125 (4.000 CREDITS) In/Visible London
The ways we see and understand a city inform the ways we react to its space and experience our lives. Artists, writers and architects continuously explore the boundaries between reality and imagination and make visible the creative spaces we inhabit. Through visits, individual and group projects and storytelling, students will take a series of spatial journeys as a means of exploring their own creative responses to urban reality, actively engaging with the visible and fictional landscapes of London.
FYS 3130 (4.000 CREDITS) Bond & Beyond: A Cultural & Poll Hist
For nearly fifty years, James Bond has been a hugely popular cultural icon, and it has been calculated that a quarter of the planet’s population has seen a Bond film. Bond was born in the British Empire, became a spy in the Second World War, learnt his craft fighting communists – often in league with his American cousins – and today battles terrorists, media barons and assorted megalomaniacs. Thus the history of Bond is also an international history of the second half of the twentieth century. This course is not designed to be a celebration of Bond’s status as a literary and film icon, but rather aims to use Bond, as represented in both the books and films, as a means to study international history, as well as cultural and political change over the past fifty years. This course will be particularly relevant to History, International Relations, and Politics Majors.
FYS 3135 (4.000 CREDITS) In Search Of Wealth
The course introduces students to economic history and the history of economic thought. Past economic structures, institutions, and commercial developments will be studied within the framework of the prevailing economic ideas at the time. The course covers the time period from the period of the early days to the commerce in the 18th century until today’s period of globalization. This course is of value to students who pursue a course of study in business or economics as well as in other disciplines as it covers a wide range of issues including sociology, political philosophy and international relations.
FYS 3145 (4.000 CREDITS) Clouds and Holes: Creativity Workshop
In an increasingly competitive world, creativity is one of the most significant characteristics of success. Creativity is what lies behind invention, the perception of new opportunities, applications and ideas. It is vital to business, industry, the digital arenas, science, social progress, sport as well as the arts. This course aims to help students understand the nature of creativity and involve them in a number of projects that demonstrate how their own creative potential can be developed, and to set in motion processes that positively influence their future performance no matter what their career objectives or life ambitions may be.