12.1

An International Education,
A London Location,
A Global Future

Flexible Curriculum at Richmond University

Flexible Start Dates

With the opportunity to start your
course in the Autumn (Fall) or the Spring

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British and international internships

Richmond offers all students the opportunity to take an internship

Richmond The American University in London

Academic Requirements

We accept qualifications from around the world

Minor in European Studies

Programme Overview

The minor in European Studies explores the evolution, and gradual development of, the European ‘states’ system. It will provide a comparative cultural, economic, historical, and political analysis of how Europe has evolved and functioned, illustrating the ways in which ‘states’ interact with one another within systems. It will begin with the fall of the Roman Empire in Western Europe; move through to the early European systems of the medieval period, on to the wars of religion of the sixteenth century, the defeat of Napoleon in 1813, and end with the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. This course will analyse the development of European international systems, the methods via which they were spread, and examine the elaborate rules and practices that regulate them, ancient Europe through to the modern day.

Programme Structure

Minor Requirements - US Credits 18 - UK Credits 72

TWO of the following
An introduction to the themes and debates that have constituted modern thought and consciousness: nature, religion, science, progress, education, gender, and the public sphere. These themes are explored through critical reading of key texts by Locke, Rousseau, Diderot, Voltaire, Kant, and through contemporary visual representations and modern visual media. Students debate the role of reason in science and religion; the centrality of knowledge and education to the development of the enlightened individual; and the importance of sociability, politeness, and conversation in the formation of the secular system of values which shaped modern society. The course is designed to be interactive, with lectures, seminars, class presentations, and class visits to relevant exhibitions.
INR 4105 (3.000 CREDITS) Evolution of International Systems
This course is designed to be a study of the evolution, and gradual development of, the European ‘states’ system. It will provide a comparative cultural, economic, historical, and political analysis of how international systems have evolved and functioned, illustrating the ways in which ‘states’ interact with one another within systems. It will begin with the fall of the Roman Empire in Western Europe, move through to the early European systems of the medieval period, on to the wars of religion of the sixteenth century, the defeat of Napoleon in 1813, and end with the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. This course will analyse the development of European international systems, the methods via which they were spread, and examine the elaborate rules and practices that regulate them.
PHL 4100 (3.000 CREDITS) Introduction to Philosophy
This course introduces students to discipline of philosophy. It examines various branches of philosophy including logic, epistemolgy, ontology, ethics, political and religious philosophy. It takes a topic-based rather than historical approach, and looks at set of problems such as the mind-body problem, empiricism versus rationalism, and subjectivism versus naturalism. To this end, various important Western philosophers will be considered including Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant & Russell.
PLT 4100 (3.000 CREDITS) Major Political Thinkers
This course provides students with an introduction to political thought and political philosophy, as it has developed in the Western World. The origins of modern political thought and political ideologies are discovered and explored through the study of a range of major political thinkers, such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Marx, Mill, and Nietzsche.
plus FOUR of the following
AVC 5405 (3.000 CREDITS) The Renaissance: New Perspectives
This course challenges the common assumption that the Renaissance is a typically Italian phenomenon, paying particular attention to Northern Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with special reference to England, France, Germany and Flanders. Students are introduced to issues related to the Northern European interplay between political agendas, social structures and religious ideologies on the one hand, and visual art on the other. The course includes sustained engagement with the rich intercultural collections of museums and galleries in London.
HST 5110 (3.000 CREDITS) Nationalism And Conflict
This course is intended to be a comparative study of the various forms of nationalism, dictatorship and democracy that evolved and emerged across Central/Eastern Europe (CEE) during the ‘short’ twentieth century (1914-1990). It seeks to identify how CEE has been defined and how it came to take its present form. The main focus of this course will be on the various ideological currents that have shaped the region’s history – in particular nationalism, democracy and Communism. In addition, it will explore the conflicting arguments and different historical interpretations with regard to the key events of the period, including the development of nationalism, the emergence of fascism and Communism, the causes and courses of the two world wars and the Cold War, and finally, the causes behind the ‘reunification’ of Europe after 1989.
HST 5205 (3.000 CREDITS) Rome&East:Culture&Faith Late Antiquity
The course covers the areas of the Roman and Sasanian Empires, their adjoining regions and that of their successor states from 200 AD until in 800 AD. The course looks at religious ideas that were rooted in these societies, Polytheisms, Zoroastrianism, Judaism and the newer religions of Christianity and Islam. Students will learn about different methods of critically analysing the material cultures of these peoples: including architecture, mosaics, texts, monuments, murals and the artefacts of both common and elite life. Links will be made from the ideological and cultural aspects of these societies to the political and economic systems in place around them. Historical debates will be explored about the nature of Late Antiquity and whether it can best be understood as a period of cross cultural interaction or as a set of distinct changes in highly localized societies.
INB 6210 (3.000 CREDITS) European Business Environment
Focuses on the economic, political, social environment for business in Europe within this field, it examines the institutional interplay with the European Union, the dynamics between the different Member States and the different policies with direct relevance to businesses operating in the European Union.
PHL 5400 (3.000 CREDITS) Modern European Mind
This Course examines the development of the European philosophical tradition from the Pre-Modern period, through the Modern Period, and considers some Contemporary philosophical trends. Students will study original texts from thinkers as diverse as Thomas a Kempis, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Barthes, Foucault and Butler. Philosophical pairs such as rationalism and empiricism, idealism and materialism, and structuralism and poststructuralism will be examined. The influence of science and psychology on the 'modern European mind' will also be reviewed.
PLT 5405 (3.000 CREDITS) The EU in New International System
Historical beginnings of the European Union, its institutions and its economic performance. The Single European Act, the European Monetary System, social, political and economic aspects of integration and foreign policy cooperation.

At least three of the upper division courses required for a minor must be taken at Richmond. No more than three courses may overlap within a degree between a student’s major and any minor.

  • Minor

Tuition Fees: 2017/18 & 2018/19 entry per annum, students from:

UK/EU

£9,250

US

$38,000

Rest of the World

£14,500

Study Suggestions
Add a area of specialism to your studies by taking a minor in European Studies.