12.1

An International Education,
A London Location,
A Global Future

Flexible Curriculum at Richmond University

Flexible Start Dates

With the opportunity to start your
course in the Autumn (Fall) or the Spring

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British and international internships

Richmond offers all students the opportunity to take an internship

Richmond The American University in London

Academic Requirements

We accept qualifications from around the world

Minor in Art History and Visual Culture

The Minor in Art History and Visual Culture gives you an essential introduction into both areas, and then goes on to include senior courses of your choice where you can expand on your knowledge.

Testimonials

I often say that my year at Richmond the American International University in London was the best year of my life so far.

Jessica Wright
Jessica WrightCoordinator of Elementary School Programs New-York Historical Society

It’s not just about study, this is your story

Studying abroad

Whether you’re studying in another country, or studying here at the university in London, with Richmond University you have the opportunity to study abroad. That could mean trying out university in London for a semester to a year, studying overseas at any of our partner locations across the world, or taking part in a world internship – designed to give you the experience you need to complement your programme.

Employability

We offer career support and advice throughout your studies, doing everything we can to make sure you stand out from the crowd when you graduate. Just by taking part in a liberal arts degree, you’re learning a wealth of transferable skills, including learning to adapt to the working climate – essential criteria employers look for. You could also benefit from work experiences and internships as part of your programme; giving you an extra advantage at the start of your career.

Post graduation

  • Photography
  • Graphic Design
  • Video Production
  • Illustration
  • Museum / Gallery / Auction House
  • Creative Consultancy
Programme structure

Minor requirements - US Credits 18 - UK Credits 72

Throughout history and across cultures, humans have always found meaning and pleasure in translating their own natural, political and religious environment into images. This course focuses on key visual moments of this process, and explores their art-historical significance in relation to the specific societal context in which they were produced. It includes an examination of the most innovative and prolific artistic ideas of Western and non-Western cultures, and explores creative exchanges across and within artistic communities. Art-historical constructs, such as those of Tradition, the Primitive and the Orient, as well as the influences of non-European visual cultures on the development of modern European art are considered. Students will be encouraged to critically engage with various topics during in-class discussions and visits to London’s rich offerings of museums and gallery collections.
AVC 4205 (3 CREDITS) Introduction to Visual Culture
This course explores images and representations across cultural and historical contexts: the way meaning and ideologies can be decoded from such cultural artifacts as advertising, photography, cinema, modern art, sculpture, architecture, propaganda and comic books. Through varied examples, it takes an introductory route through some of the most important cultural theories and concepts.
This course provides an introduction to the study of mass media in contemporary modern societies. The course will pay particular attention to the production and consumption of mass media, including newspapers and magazines, television, film, radio, and the internet. Thus the course will encourage students to critically analyse the strategies of media giants, the impact of media ownership over democracy, the effects of media over culture, identities and public opinion. Each topic of the course will be examined with reference to contemporary examples of mass media.

plus two Level 5 AVC course chosen from the core list of the major
plus one the following:

AVC 6405 (3 CREDITS) New Media & Visual Power
This course complements the work undertaken in AVC 6XXX Visualising People & Place. Through theoretical and empirical insights into our image-based culture, this course deals with the multifariousness of contemporary visuality. Integrating traditional elements of visual analysis and visual methodologies with new media and transmedia approaches, the course enables students to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual in contemporary society and culture – moving from issues of production, image dissemination, to consumption (reception theory). The course is based around 4 broad themes: Practices of Looking (Research Methods); Reproduction and Commodification of Images; New Media Visions, Interactivity and the Cybermuseum; and Visual Power and Surveillance Culture. In a program of gallery visits and theoretical discussions, students learn about visual representation and various ways of encountering the complexity of imagery in the twentieth/twenty-first century.
AVC 6410 (3 CREDITS) Visualising People & Place
This course complements the work undertaken in AVC 6405 New Media & Visual Power. Through theoretical and empirical insights into our image-based culture, this course deals with the multifariousness of contemporary visuality. Integrating traditional elements of visual analysis and visual methodologies with new media and transmedia approaches, the course enables students to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual in contemporary society and culture – moving from issues of production, image dissemination, to consumption (reception theory). The course is based around 4 broad themes: Feminist Art History; Representing World Cultures; Visualizing the Other; Art & Space. In a program of gallery visits and theoretical discussions, students learn about visual representation and various ways of encountering the complexity of imagery in the twentieth/twenty-first century.

Faculty